Memorializing George Ward and sons

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Little Stone House

They call it the Little Stone House, situated on a 14-acre plot of land on Longwoods Road (Highway 2) just east of Thamesville.

This house was nothing more than a clapboard homestead built in 1870 when Sarah Gamble bought the property in 1926. She was a school teacher who came up from Detroit to find a summer retreat for her and husband Stanley Gamble.

Unfortunately Stan lost Sarah and their infant son at childbirth, so in honour of his beloved wife, he transformed the dwelling into a cobblestone cottage.

Eventually he formed a partnership with local artist Annie Aldred and together they established The Little Stone Tea House. Stan then created a beautiful courtyard with cobblestone archways, a popular place for couples to have their wedding photography done.

Stanley passed away in 1952, and Annie’s tea house closed. The property now belongs to Annie’s nephew Robert Aldred from London.

By John De Boer who lives in Kitchener and enjoys daytripping off the beaten path.   Posted June 1, 2016 in the Kitchener Post    

Source: De Boer’s treasures: Little Stone House

Wardsville Legacy Portrait display wraps up

The Wardsville Legacy Portraits in the Heritage Gallery at the Arts and Cookery Bank will be replaced by a new show featuring the natural beauty of our region.

The Legacy Potraits occupied the Great Hall gallery September 30, 2011 – March 31, 2014

Legacy Portrait, Wardsville

“Photographs Capturing a Moment in History”

How the Subjects Were Photographed

Over the course of two days in June 2011, about 260 people posed in 69 groupings in a temporary studio set up in the pavilion of the Wardsville baseball park.  A team of “wranglers” provided logistical support as folks signed in and queued up for the sittings.  David Chidley, an accomplished local photographer, shot each group using a digital camera and provided invaluable on-site counsel and equipment. The local “Package Nanny” (Heather Rowe) set up a digital printer in the ‘studio’ and every group received a high-quality color print on the spot.

Larry Merin used a vintage Hasselblad camera for the portraits, since archivally processed film can be safely stored for decades without deterioration. The project was designed to provide the people of Wardsville with a ‘shoebox’ of images that could be stored in a form that could be seen easily in the future.  Stored in archives, the Legacy negatives should remain in pristine condition for many years.  Hopefully, they will be printed anew in 2110.

Folks grouped themselves for the sittings; most were couples and families.  We also photographed people linked by work (the Wardsville Volunteer Fire Department) and by hobbies (barbershop singers, ballroom dancers, barn quilt painters, a brass band).  It was a special honor to photograph a group of War Brides.

There was no 1-2-3 and no “Say Cheese.”  Larry reminded each group that the purpose of the photography session was to produce a historical record.  He asked them to look into the camera and imagine that their expression and pose would be the way future generations would come to know them.  Some responded with smiles, while others were pensive.  Some adopted formal poses while others were spontaneous.  The photographs reveal the people of Wardsville the way they see themselves and wish others to see them:  straightforward, friendly, proud of their village and comfortable with their way of life.

I am grateful to all who presented themselves to our cameras and allowed Dave Chidley and I to record their names and faces for coming generations.

Lawrence Merin, September 2011, Nashville


 


To Editor of Glencoe Transcript from UTMRS Bicentennial Committee.

On behalf of the Upper Thames Military Re-enactment Society (UTMRS) who portray the Royal Scots Light Company of 1814, I would like to express our deepest thanks to the community of Southwest Middlesex for their excellent support and co-operation during our recent War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration of the Battle of Longwoods from March 4-9. The Southwest Middlesex Municipal Council and Staff assisted us in much of the minutiae of organizing an event which meant the closing down of the Longwoods Road, erecting a monument, erecting a tent as well as arranging the billeting of numerous re-enactors.

 

The Creative Communities Committee did a wonderful job of arranging for a Dinner and Reception at the Glencoe Agricultural Hall on the Saturday, March 8.   This same organization decorated the windows of the Glencoe merchants, and with the co-operation of the Southwest Middlesex Council, Staff and Community decorated with large bows the hydro poles of Melbourne, Appin, Glencoe and Wardsville to commemorate the Bicentennial Event.

 

The entire week showed wonderful community spirit with a brunch provided by the Newbury Fire Services at the Newbury Fire Hall on Saturday morning. The billeting of the re-enactors at the Masonic Hall in Wardsville and the Glencoe Arena on Friday and Saturday nights was kindly arranged by the Staff of Southwest Middlesex. Wardsville United Church provided through the efforts of Todd Trojand a pancake supper Tuesday, March 4, breakfast and lunch on Sunday, March 9.

 

The Southwest Middlesex Fire Department including the Wardsville Fire Department and the Glencoe Fire Department assisted with the Glencoe Lions Club did yeoman service on a cold winter’s day in parking well over 200 cars on the shoulders of the Longwoods Road. Tom McCollum and John McColl deserve special recognition for their efforts to flawlessly handle this important task.

 

It is important to recognize the assistance of Dave Little and helpers who guided traffic, spectators (and yes, re-enactors) at the Battle Hill site with extreme efficiency and co-operation.

 

The memorial service held on Tuesday, March 4, (the actual time of the original Battle of Longwoods) was organized and conducted by Reverend Richard Golden and Betty Simpson of the Glencoe and District Historical Society.

 

The old Community Hall in Wardsville, now the home of Crocodile Productions, was the scene of an excellent variety show called, The Royal Bash, on Friday night, March 7.

 

Another feature of the week was the excellent coverage by the daily and weekly newspapers of the local communities. From a series of articles about the background of the Battle of Longwoods to coverage of related activities it was an amazing effort on the part of these periodicals to alert and inform the public.

 

The comment I remember most was from one of our re-enactors who had travelled from Toronto to be at the event. He commented in wonderment how such a large Commemoration Event as the Battle of Longwoods could have been carried off in the middle of nowhere with such a large audience, military servicemen and re-enactors so smoothly and without a hitch. The answer is the wonderful co-operation of the Southwest Middlesex Community. Thank you so very much for making the week a wonderful Bicentennial event!

 

Glenn Stott, Chair

UTMRS Bicentennial Committee.

 

200 years later: bicentennial ceremony

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Two hundred years after the battle, the local community gathers with representatives from the British Red Coat re-enactors, U.S. Kentuckians, and  Canadian Militia.  The Middlesex County transfers a parcel of land to the local municipality, Southwest Middlesex to become a memorial park honouring the 21 men who died March 2014 fighting for democracy.

In Memory of Lawrence M. Merin

July 5, 1951 – November 7, 2012
Lawrence Mitchell Merin, a beloved family man and gifted photographer whose work improved the lives of others, died Wednesday, Nov. 7, at home. He was 61.
Larry was the founder and director of the Vanderbilt Ophthalmic Imaging Center at Vanderbilt University and an assistant professor of ophthalmology. Through the center’s program, Larry and his staff took their cameras to every county in Tennessee, screening indigent and uninsured patients for diabetic retinopathy, a condition that leads to blindness. It was the first fully mobile service of its kind.A Detroit native, Larry developed an early interest in photography, and studied mass communications and photography at Wayne State University, where he earned a baccalaureate with honors. Larry’s career as an ophthalmic photographer and instructor included positions at Sinai Hospital of Detroit, Riverside Community Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock.While in Riverside, Larry met and married the love of his life, the former Becky Vazquez. The couple celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary Sept. 4.
Upon joining Vanderbilt in Nashville in 2000, Larry obtained the support and funding to start the Vanderbilt Ophthalmic Imaging Center. A leading expert in his field, he contributed to textbooks and professional journals, and taught courses in the United States as well as in Poland, England, Scotland, Italy, Japan and Singapore. He was a registered biological photographer, a fellow and former president of the Ophthalmic Photographers Society and a fellow of the Institute of Medical Illustrators in London. Other affiliations included the American Academy of Ophthalmology. During his career, he earned numerous certifications and awards. Larry’s photography extended beyond the medical field, and he had several exhibits through the years, including one of Vietnam War protest photos taken when he marched as a protester in Washington. For the bicentennial of his mother’s hometown of Wardsville, Canada, Larry took portraits of every resident for a time capsule that will be opened in 2110.
A loving father, husband and brother, Larry was devoted to his family. He served on the advisory board of the Choral Arts Link/MET Singers Honor Choir of Metro Nashville Public Schools, and he provided leadership as a committee member for Boy Scout Troop 3 in East Nashville, where his son, David, is an Eagle Scout. He also was a community steering committee member of the Tennessee State University Prostate Cancer Screening Barriers Study; an associate member of Grupo Comunitario Hispano de Tennessee; and an associate member of the Nashville Latino Health Council. He was an avid reader, car enthusiast and model railroader, and he enjoyed chasing steam locomotives. Larry had a lively sense of humor and a passion for social justice, and he was a proud survivor of breast cancer.
Larry was preceded in death by his parents, Anne Gayle and Earl Merin. He is survived by his wife, Rebecca Ruth Merin, daughter, Sydney Rachel Merin, and son, David Alexander Merin, all of Nashville; sister, Elaine Merin Perri of Chicago; mother-in-law and father-in-law Esther and John Cervantes of Riverside, Calif.; three sisters-in-law, Julie (Doug) King, Riverside, Calif., Anna (Mike) Lemos, Venture, Calif., and Debra Vazquez, San Diego, Calif.; and many nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews.